Man Dies After Taking Form Of Chloroquine Phosphate Used As Aquarium Cleaner

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Man Dies After Taking Form Of Chloroquine Phosphate Used As Aquarium Cleaner

Please be aware that there are drugs which bear similar names and they are not meant for human consumption.

As you may well know, President Trump says 10,000 units of the drug chloroquine will be distributed in New York and the government will start clinical trials of existing drugs that may work in the fight against coronavirus.

Chloroquine, or Chloroquine Phosphate, according to WebMD , is used to prevent or treat malaria caused by mosquito bites in countries where malaria is common.

Please be aware that there are drugs which bear similar names and they are not meant for human consumption.

Chloroquine phosphate is considered a "wonder drug" in the Saltwater Marine aquarium hobby. It is considered the drug of choice for many public aquariums. It has been widely used by hobbyists in the early days of the marine aquarium hobby and used in the aquaculture industry since the 70s and 80s

https://youtu.be/NymI6xO5tLQ

A man from the Phoenix area along with his wife made a tragic mistake. The pair, who are both in their 60s, took chloroquine phosphate, the additive used to clean fish tanks in an effort to be safe from the coronavirus. The Chloroquine Phosphate which is used as an additive to clean fish tanks uses a different formulation than the antimalarial medication.

Health officials are now warning the general public after the man died and his wife was hospitalized in critical condition from self-medicating to treat coronavirus.

Image by BaptiseGrandGrand, CC BY-SA 4.0
Image by BaptiseGrandGrand, CC BY-SA 4.0

Both husband and wife became gravely ill within thirty minutes of taking the drug. They experienced immediate effects.

“Given the uncertainty around COVID-19, we understand that people are trying to find new ways to prevent or treat this virus, but self-medicating is not the way to do so. The last thing that we want right now is to inundate our emergency departments with patients who believe they found a vague and risky solution that could potentially jeopardize their health,” said Dr. Daniel Brooks, Banner Poison and Drug Information Center medical director in a statement .

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advises on its website that "there are no US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs specifically for the treatment of patients with COVID-19," and a vaccine is estimated to remain at least a year away.

The wife of the deceased male spoke with NBC News , telling them that "she'd watched televised briefings during which President Trump talked about the potential benefits of chloroquine".

https://twitter.com/CBSNews/status/1242217155141292033

They took the drug because they "were afraid of getting sick," she said. "I had (the substance) in the house because I used to have koi fish," she told the network . "I saw it sitting on the back shelf and thought, 'Hey, isn't that the stuff they're talking about on TV?'"

The couple decided that since they were both considered high risk, they would mix a small amount with liquid and drink it to try and prevent getting coronavirus.

They both began to feel dizzy and hot. "I started vomiting," the woman told NBC News. "My husband started developing respiratory problems and wanted to hold my hand."

The wife was able to call 911. The emergency responders "were asking a lot of questions" about what they'd consumed. "I was having a hard time talking, falling down."

Shortly after they arrived at the hospital, her husband died.

The message here is loud and clear. Please DO NOT engage in self-medication. This will cause harm and can lead to death.

The wife of the deceased male has a message: ""Be careful and call your doctor," she said.

"This is a heartache I'll never get over."