Grandpa Leaves A Free Bucket Of Baseballs With Heartfelt Note At Batting Cage

Forgot password?

Delete Comment

Are you sure you want to delete this comment?

Grandpa Leaves A Free Bucket Of Baseballs With Heartfelt Note At Batting Cage

He left the bucket outside his local batting cage along with a note that would bring tears to a glass eye.

Ethan Anderson recently posted a couple of pictures his grandma sent him up on Twitter.

He had no idea that they would get the kind of reaction they did, but they have touched the hearts of just about everybody who sees them.

It seems his 72-year-old grandpa, Randy Long, from Montgomery, Alabama, had been cleaning out the garage when he came across a whole lot of baseballs.

I think it's something we can all relate to - I just cleaned out my garage last weekend. It's coming time to move my summer patio things inside and I needed to make room. However, what Mr. Long did was a whole lot sweeter than just donating them to a charity as I do with things no longer used.

You see the balls he found were the practice balls he used to toss around with his son, and then his grandson. He thought maybe a new generation of future baseball stars may be able to put them to good use.

He left the bucket outside his local batting cage along with a note that would bring tears to a glass eye.

“Hope someone can use some of these baseballs in the batting cages. I found them cleaning my garage. I pitched them to my son and grandson for countless rounds. My son is now 46 y/o and my grandson is 23 y/o. I am 72 and what I won’t give to pitch a couple of buckets to them. They have both moved away. If you are a father cherish these times. You won’t believe how quickly they will be gone.

God bless

P.S. Give them a hug and tell them you love them every chance you get.”

https://twitter.com/TheBigE_21/status/1310710580660051968

Ethan, of course, is the grandson who posted the pictures on Twitter , where it went viral as fathers and sons thought back to their times together on a baseball field or in the backyard. "When I was a kid we would usually go a few times a week to hit in the cages," Ethan told ESPN . "Many times I didn't even want to go, but he always wanted me to be the best player I could be."

"It's been reminding people of the times they had with their dads and granddads back in the day in the baseball cages," Ethan said. "A lot of people (were) just thanking me and saying they're going to go do those things with their son or grandchildren, whatever it is now, just because they don't want to miss out on those memories that they could be making."

Like
Comment
Loading comments