Fast Action After Being Burned With Scalding Water Saved This Little Girl
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Fast Action After Being Burned With Scalding Water Saved This Little Girl

A scald injury can happen at any age. Children, older adults and people with disabilities are especially at risk.

Did you know that most “fire-related injuries” are burns. 

According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), approximately every 60 seconds someone in the U.S. sustains a burn injury serious enough to require treatment. A scald injury can happen at any age. Children, older adults and people with disabilities are especially at risk.

When little Aoife was just 13 months old, she had an accident that caused two pans of hot water to splash on to her. 

Image by Three-shots from Pixabay

She suffered burns to her arms, face, neck and feet. Her family acted quickly and put the affected areas under tepid water. Aoife then had to receive care at the Burns unit in Alder Hey Children's Hospital and Charity. She was there for four weeks being treated. 

https://www.facebook.com/alderheyhospital/photos/pcb.2932883126740122/2932882950073473/?type=3&theater

This story has a happy ending though. Aoife’s parents, Jodie and Sue, said; "The burns team have been like family to us. They have done such a fantastic job and we can’t believe the transformation. Aiofe is now 4. She attends pre-school and is just a normal, happy four year old.”

https://www.facebook.com/alderheyhospital/photos/pcb.2932883126740122/2932883070073461/?type=3&theater

"Aiofe's now 4. She is due to have laser treatment & z-plasty in the future, but she’s flourishing. She loves octonaut, attends pre-school and is just a normal, happy 4 year old.”

https://twitter.com/AlderHey/status/1184442655163518977

Here are some Scald Safety Tips from the NFPA:

  • Teach children that hot things can burn. 
  • Install anti-scald devices on tub faucets and shower heads. 
  • Always supervise a child in or near a bathtub. 
  • Test the water at the faucet. It should be less than 100° Fahrenheit (38° Celsius). 
  • Before placing a child in the bath or getting in the bath yourself, test the water. 
  • Test the water by moving your hand, wrist and forearm through the water. The water should feel warm, not hot, to the touch. 
  • Place hot liquids and food in the center of a table or toward the back of a counter. 
  • Have a “kid-free zone” of at least 3 feet around the stove and areas where hot food or drink is prepared or carried. 
  • Open microwaved food slowly, away from the face. 
  • Never hold a child while you are cooking, drinking a hot liquid, or carrying hot foods or liquids. 
  • Never heat a baby bottle in a microwave oven. Heat baby bottles in warm water from the faucet. 
  • Allow microwaved food to cool before eating. 
  • Choose prepackaged soups whose containers have a wide base or, to avoid the possibility of a spill, pour the soup into a traditional bowl after heating.

Here is a final fact to be aware of. Prepackaged microwavable soups are a frequent cause of scald burn injuries (especially noodle soups) because they can easily tip over, pouring hot liquid (and noodles) on the person.